Review: The drug war in the Philippines reflects a brutal realism

An aggressive war on drugs is taking place in the Philippines under President Rodrigo Dotoury's administration. With an estimated between 1.8 and 3 million Filipinos who are addicted to drugs (out of a population of about 100 million), drug addiction is a serious epidemic in the peninsula country. However, Duterte's heavy tactics, including directing the public to "kill (addicts themselves)", have led to controversy over alleged human rights violations.

In fact, the crackdown against drugs has harmed many Filipinos, citizens, drug addicts, and dealers and police alike.

This is the crackdown that affected the Philippine blockbuster bystander, showing that the sting operation has gone wrong. Our main character is Nina Munigan (Anne Curtis), a member of the Elite Squad of the Drug Enforcement Agency of the Philippines (PDEA), tasked with arresting the local drug lord "Buggie".

From the beginning of the film, we have been presented with an incredibly realistic approach to training conducted by PDEA agents. From mock-up building raids to life-long fire drills, the training that PDEA agents receive will not be out of place for the military special forces team. In fact, it is the military discipline that designates PDEA in the real world, in addition to other Philippine police units, the National GenderMari and Army Generals have ordered PDEA.

In Bybest, Agent Michigan's team is trapped in a slum population after drug paraphernalia, in which local residents and drug cartels hunt them. At the same time, Michigan is trying to expose the "squad" that betrayed its team.

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(Photo courtesy of Well Go USA)

What stood out the most in The Beast was the very realistic presentation of gun battles and the near fighter. In both films and in fact, the PDEA is equipped with M-16 rifles, which have a 30 round magazine and is commonly used in semi-automatic firing mode, and a 1911 pistol, which is usually a 7 round magazine. Is. These weapons are not new to cinema. Because it is the standard weapon of the US Army and many of its allies, firearms. 16 is the same in cinema and video games. However, in many films the M-16 has been portrayed as a ray unlimited magazine capacity, without the need to reload (and often, without the ammunition protagonist's role). Capable of delivering accurate, fully automatic fire.

Bybest breaks down this tradition of imagining firearms. Our main characters fire their M-16 rifles semi-automatically – as they are commonly used in real-world militants. And they have to remove the ammunition. In the middle of the film, PDEA agents run out of ammunition for their backup pistols, and begin searching for weapons from the drug cartel they are trying to escape.

Beyond the realistic offer of a gun battle, Bistro does not shy away from the cruel facts of the drug war. Citizens living in Katchi population get caught up in the shooting incident, and eventually stand up to attack both the drug cartel and the PDEA agents, telling them to "kill each other somewhere." Of course, PDEA agents have to defend themselves against attacks by brutally killing civilians and civilians. One particularly memorable scene depicts an PDEA agent who beheaded a citizen with scissors.

In this way, Bybest shows that for many poor Filipinos, "war on drugs" is not the most important issue – many citizens just want to enjoy life and enjoy happiness. However, in a war between drug cartels and the government, civilians ended up being shot.

However, at the time of the Beast comes a real blockbuster rather than an indie production. Much remains to be desired by cinematography, and director Eric Mattey uses a vigorous musical track during tense tension, which only helps to reduce his intensity.

All of them say, ByBeast is one of the few films included in Filipino films to be included in the American silver screen. The Welsh Go Entertainment (which provided the cinema screenplay to the film screener) will be screened in movie theaters across the United States. The articles explored in Bybest are incredibly relevant to the American audience and beyond, with US President Donald Trump announcing war on opium and drugs from across the border in Mexico.

Byst Philippines. Director Eric Mattie. Running time 2 hours 6 minutes. First released on June 2018. Actors Ann Curtis, Brandon Vera, Victor Neri, Arjo Attey.

Source link https://www.cinemaescapist.com/2018/07/review-buybust-brutally-realistic-depiction-philippine-drug-war/

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